Hints and Tips on News-Writing for Magazines and Newspapers


Getting started often gives writers the most trouble. Actually it’s easy! Just think of what you’d say to a friend when imparting news over the telephone:

For example, you’d be unlikely to say this:

The sun was shining brightly in a clear blue sky when the Queen visited Pangbourne today. The townsfolk were out in force to welcome their monarch as she toured local schools and businesses. Children sang a specially-composed madrigal, and she was presented with a silver plate by the local history society. Towards the end of her hour’s stay she was shot by a demented boy scout and is now fighting for her life in the Royal Berkshire Hospital.

You’d probably say something like this:

The Queen was shot by a boy scout in Pangbourne today. She may live.

Daft example of course, but it makes the point…which is: Get to the Point Straight Away.

B) And there’s more:

It is unlikely that one paragraph will be sufficient. Subsequent ones may well be needed to flesh out the detail. If so, remember the golden rule BASH.1. Choose your topics wisely. Remember, you should only be writing about newsworthy and current stories that your target readers will find interesting. In any given day, there are a lot of stories that you can write but choose only those that will grab your audience by the throat. More details please visit:-https://niffler.in/ https://www.enginesoils.com/ https://air-queen.de https://www.businessprotech.com/ https://www.healthnlifestyletips.com/

Brevity

Short words and short sentences have greatest impact.

Take a logical sequence, never make readers turn back to understand.

Accuracy

Forget the old adage: If in doubt, leave out.

Better to remind yourself: If in doubt, find out.

Simplicity

Never write to impress. Most magazines and newspapers are for general not specialist consumption, so the least-informed reader should not be made to feel ‘inferior’ or ‘out of the know’. If anyone has to reach for a dictionary or just gives up you’ve failed. If the weather’s dull say dull not crepuscular.

Heredity

Remember to attribute comment or opinion.

And always put your own name and contact detail at the bottom of any press release or article – if you don’t want this detail published start it with:


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