How do I become a Mobile DJ?

The Pro’s (and woes!) of becoming a Mobile D.J!

So how do you become a Mobile D.J?, easy!, just call yourself one!. There are no diploma’s or qualifications and no graduation ceremony. However the time may come where you are called upon to demonstrate your D.J’ing skills and often this will be in front of 100’s of people at your first gig. Entertaining such a a large number of people can be a very daunting and nerve racking task.

Not just music and flashing lights

Mobile D.J’ing is different to club or radio D.J’ing. Just spending a fortune on the very latest equipment and latest chart music won’t make you a successful D.J or get you re-booked. Being a Mobile D.J is also about being an entertainer, rather then just being a Jukebox surrounded by lots of pretty lights!. You will also have to play a lot of music genres which you may not otherwise choose to listen to by choice.

A successful D.J is one who plays to his or her Audience, who can break the ice at difficult functions and who isn’t out to satisfy their own ego’s. Most D.J’s learn to “read” the audience, and are frequently watching the dancefloor to gauge what music will work next. At Mobile Functions such as Weddings, your audience may take some time to get onto the dancefloor and this is where Microphone work is important in order to break the ice, make your audience feel welcome and encourage them onto the dancefloor.

Where and how can I learn D.J skills and get advice?

Some people simply may not be cut out to D.J. Others may pick up the skills in a few months, others may take a year or longer. There is no hard or fast rule to learning the basics. The best, and often the most successful route to becoming a D.J is by helping another D.J at weekends.

Consider volunteering your services to another D.J locally. Helping out as a “Roadie” may not be financially rewarding but you are essentially learning new skills for free, which would cost you £100’s on a course. Most D.J’s will often cover your expenses and refreshments, some may even pay you, in return for your help, but don’t expect to live off it, after all they are doing you a favour by teaching you a trade, and sharing their knowledge.

Learning to D.J by becoming a Roadie is the fastest way to learn the business and by actually watching another Professional D.J at work can teach you more than in a classroom or College environment. Most D.J’s themselves got into the business this way, so don’t be afraid to ask.

What music will I need?

This is entirely dependent on the type of functions which you are attending. Most Mobile DJ’s will set themselves up to cover all types of functions from Childrens’ Parties to 75th Wedding Anniversaries, and this means playing music to all age groups. Ideally you will need to invest in virtually all types of Genres. Rock & Roll, 1960’s, 1970’s, Disco, Funk, Soul, Motown, 1980’s, 1990’s as well as the latest chart and club dance music.

If you are setting yourself up as a specialist DJ, offering services for one age group or type of function, then this will be a lot easier to fund and build a music collection. However you may wish to gauge the demand for that type of music and DJ in your area.

https://www.besteuhren.to/
https://safeblastcrypto.com/
https://marketingdivergent.com/

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *